142 Days

On November 15, 2013, after a few weeks of business travel delay,  I was officially certified to begin my Solo Cross Country flights.

What does that mean?

FAR 61.109

b. 10 hours of solo time in an airplane, including:
i. 5 hours of cross-country flights
ii. One solo cross-country flight of at least 150nm total distance, with full-stop
landings at a minimum of three points and with one segment of the flight
consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 50nm between takeoff and
landing locations
iii. Three solo takeoffs and landings to a full stop at an airport with an operating
control tower

That’s what I needed to accumulate.

It was still autumn, albeit late autumn but surely the above would be the proverbial walk in the park.

The plan was 3 flights:

  1. N94-KIPT-N94 (Williamsport, PA).  This would be the “short” cross country.  
  2. N94-KUNV-N94 (Penn State), This would be a another “short” cross country.  Essentially a time builder.
  3. N94-KUNV (Penn State) -KLNS (Lancaster, PA)-N94.  The “BIG” one.  The last one.

In November, facing the onset of winter with dismay, my CFI stated, “There are often more VFR days in the Winter time than any other season.” While that may have been a historically accurate statement, this year, not so.

To say that this Winter has been an aviation “challenge” is an understatement.  To say that the weather has been downright horrible, consistently craptastic, and generally VFR Not Recommended is perfectly accurate.

I don’t know if I have the record of planned and cancelled flights but I’ve got to be close. Perfect marketing for getting one to consider an Instrument Rating. Of course, I’ve still got this PPL thing in the works so first things first.

It took 10 times to get the initial flight in. 7 tries (minimum ’cause I stopped keeping track lest I get a severe case of seasonal affective disorder) for the time builder (which will be detailed later) and at least 10 for the Long XC.

On the positive side, I am now a certified Jedi Master ADM as it relates to finding reasons that a XC flight can’t be made. Despite lets say a round 30 scheduled attempts, some of which got all the way up to the point where I had the plane loaded and ready to go, I don’t think there was ever a time where we decided I shouldn’t go when I could have and clearly some which, where I was given the go/no go decision and I said no, it turned out to be the right choice.

But then came April 6, 2014.  The 5th was sunny but horribly windy. Both the Dual Lesson as well as the XC were cancelled. The forecast for the 6th looked VERY promising but as the sun set on the 5th the wind continued to blow.

Sunday morning, bright (well I should say dark) and early, the sky was clear, the air crisp but calm. The forecast was right….and the flight was on.

A little frost to wait out as the sun came up but some time to get everything in order, one last checkout and then off on the journey.

4.5 hours later, I was back in Carlisle, mentally and physically exhausted but also finally done.

Only 142 days from start to finish! Walk in the park.  Well sort of.

Text to CFI to let her know I finally did it.

“Great!! Now the work begins.”

More details on the more “interesting” aspects of the Long XC later including a debatable radio instruction inbound to KLNS.

For now…it’s clear this student can get the plane from A->B->C->A safely.

Now, I have to prove I can really fly…like a pilot.

 

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4 thoughts on “142 Days

  1. Caitlin

    Congrats for getting it done! Sounds like you had the issues I had before soloing. I was lucky to hit a sweet spot in the weather for my XCs. But all that matters is you got it done! Checkride Prep now?

    Reply
    1. Ron Post author

      Thanks. Onto checkride prep. With all the focus on the XC I think my basic skills have become rusty but looking forward to getting them polished up and see if I can complete this journey.

      Reply
  2. Pingback: Are we there yet? | Flight 40

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